Close

Tag Archive for: habitat for humanity

A Taste of … in Charleston 2019

Mark your calendar now: February 20, 2019.

Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam is once again hosting its annual culinary fundraiser at the Clay Center for the Arts and Sciences. The 2019 “A Taste of … in Charleston” will feature local, Appalachian dishes with a gourmet spin. This year – the featured restaurant is a popular destination hailing from one of West Virginia’s top tourist spots.

A Taste of in CharlestonThis is your chance to escape the blustery cold this February and dine in style and luxury in downtown Charleston. No need to travel hours for a unique meal. As we’ve done in the past, we’re bringing one of the West Virginia’s top-rated restaurants to Charleston for one night only.

The Grand Lobby of The Clay Center will fill with food, music and members of our community as we showcase a mountain state chef’s creations for you to enjoy. “A Taste of … in Charleston” will feature five popular dishes, wine and spirits, as well as a signature dessert.  You will indulge in several unique tastes and textures that most have only read about in travel magazines. Best of all, your meal will be created with thoughtfully sourced ingredients that are respectfully and skillfully prepared.

In the coming weeks, we will drop hints and clues on our Facebook page about the restaurant and what we have in store for the Kanawha Valley this winter. Mark your calendar now: February 20, 2019. Join us in the Grand Lobby of the Clay Center in Charleston this winter for a culinary adventure.  Leave the cold behind.

Restoring Our Putnam County Commitment 

A Message from Shawn Means, Executive Director of Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam:

Thanks in part to the presence of the Teays Valley ReStore, Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam has made significant strides toward better serving Putnam County over the past two years after a long period of dormancy in the County. Since building our latest Putnam County house in Hurricane in 2014, our efforts to provide Putnam County families with homeownership opportunities had slowed dramatically because of the availability of affordable land on which to build. With decreased building activity came decreased visibility and community awareness, and so the number of people who applied for Habitat’s housing program also declined. The opening of the Teays Valley ReStore two years ago has helped Habitat regain the community awareness and has helped us reconnect with potential applications and donors. The results are tangible

  • Applications to Habitat’s homeownership program from Putnam County residents has increased by approximately 30% in the past two years.
  • Shortly after the Teays Valley ReStore opened – no doubt in part because of the increased visibility that the ReStore provides — a Putnam County land owner donated a building lot in the Scott Depot area that will be the home of a Habitat homebuyer in the near future.
  • Because of this renewed interest, Habitat is currently seeking funding for the preliminary design work on a new development near Bancroft that might provide building sites for as many as 18 single family homes, providing much needed workforce housing to the area north of the Kanawha River.
  • In 2017 Habitat held its first Putnam-centric fundraising event in over 20 years. The “Building Habitat’s Future” luncheon at Sleepy Hollow raised more than $15,000.

In addition to raising funds for home construction, the Teays Valley ReStore is an important outpost for Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha and Putnam, providing it with a vital connection to the community.

We are thankful to the ReStore team, shoppers and donors who have helped make these first two years a tremendous success.

The Kanawha Valley Board of Realtors Continues its Partnership with Habitat

The Kanawha Valley Board of Realtors Donates $1,000 and dozens of volunteers to help Habitat wrap up its 2018 construction season.

Over two dozen members of the Kanawha Valley Board of Realtors are working with Habitat for Humanity right now to get the inside of a new home ready for a local homebuyer. The volunteers are installing drywall along North Hills Drive in Charleston. This is the third year that the Board has partnered with Habitat and made a sizable donation to purchase construction materials.Realtors

The Kanawha Valley Board of Realtors is a local real estate trade association which represents hundreds of local Realtors, appraisers and affiliate members throughout the Kanawha Valley. KVBR provides leadership for the Realtor community by protecting the interests of its members, promoting their value to the real estate consumer, setting its members to the highest standards of professionalism and advocating private property rights.

Ann Boggs, Executive Vice President of the Kanawha Valley Board of Realtors, encourages Board members to participate annually in projects that help the community. Habitat for Humanity’s Development Director, William Andreas, has worked with the Board for years to help its members get involved. “The mission of Habitat isn’t just to build houses, it’s to build relationships and offer members of the community a meaningful way to give back and get involved,” Andreas says.

The Grainger Foundation Donates $5,000 to Habitat

The Grainger Foundation donates $5,000 to help a Habitat Homebuyer build their future home.

The Grainger Foundation has awarded Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam with a $5,000 check to be used on the construction of a new home on North Hills Drive in Charleston. The Foundation has also partnered with Habitat to become a sponsor for Habitat’s upcoming fundraising event, “Building Habitat’s Future.” That event will take place at Edgewood Country Club on November 8.

This new house being built will benefit a local community member who successfully completes the partnership program required by Habitat for Humanity. In addition to a down payment and zero-interest monthly mortgage payments, Habitat Homebuyers invest hundreds of hours of his or her own labor in building their house and the houses of others. In addition to investing his or her “sweat equity,” the local person selected for this home will also fulfill other requirements, including completion of Habitat’s Master Homeowner Program.

Habitat Check Presentation GraingerThe Grainger Foundation and Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam have a solid, long-standing relationship. The Foundation has made monetary donations to Habitat in the past, and Grainer also acts as a vendor for some of Habitat’s construction supplies.

Grainger’s Managers, Contact Center Directors and other upper management work to identify charitable organizations in their local communities and make grant recommendations to The Grainger Foundation ranging from $2,500 up to $10,000. As a result of recommendations submitted throughout 2017, The Grainger Foundation made nearly 900 grants totaling $5.8 million to a wide variety of organizations in the areas of health and human services, food banks, civic, disaster relief, and education.

The Grainger Foundation, an independent private foundation, was established in 1949 by William W. Grainger, the Company’s founder.

Define Your Legacy Today

You work hard to accumulate assets throughout your life, but without a valid will or trust at your death, your assets are distributed according to state law. Wouldn’t you rather determine that yourself? Although many people think of a will as the easiest way to transfer assets after their lifetime, it doesn’t cover everything. In fact, retirement plans, IRAs, life insurance and insurance annuities are not controlled by the terms of your will, but instead use separate beneficiary paperwork to determine who receives them.

Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam’s Legacy Society was founded to create new opportunities for you to give, and to preserve our future through planned gifts.

Our Legacy Society adviser will help you and your family understand your beneficiary paperwork, and help you maximize your long-term impact in our community. By planning ahead — whether in the form of a bequest, annuity, or other planned giving arrangement — you automatically become a member of Habitat for Humanity’s Legacy Society. The reasons that people are joining our Legacy Society are as varied as the members themselves, but perhaps one common denominator is a sincere desire to give back to their community. Other advantages include:

It’s revocable. With a bequest, you are not actually making a gift until your death. Until then, you are free to alter your plans, eliminating the worry that you might make a commitment you could later regret.

It’s tax-smart. Your estate is entitled to an unlimited estate tax charitable deduction for bequests to qualified charitable organizations.

If you are considering a gift to charity after your lifetime, it is usually better to leave nontaxable assets such as stocks and real estate to your loved ones and the taxable assets such as retirement accounts and IRAs to tax-exempt charitable organizations.

Tax Benefits

 

Example: Dan would like to leave our organization his $100,000 IRA after his death. If he names us as the beneficiary for 100 percent of his IRA, we would receive the entire $100,000 to help fulfill our mission. By comparison, if Dan leaves the IRA to his sister, she will owe a sizable amount of the IRA to income taxes.

 

Your beneficiary designations can be modified at any time to meet your changing needs. However, your assets may never reach your intended recipients if you’ve failed to keep all of your beneficiary designations up to date. We suggest reviewing them every two to three years to make sure your wishes are up to date.

Habitat’s Legacy Society adviser is happy to work with you and your professional advisers to determine how your investments can better our community for generations to come. Your beneficiary designations trump your will when it comes to passing along your assets at your death, making beneficiary designations effective and easy ways to leave a legacy.

If you would like more information, or to schedule a meeting with Habitat for Humanity’s Legacy Society Adviser, please complete the form below.

 

 

 

City National Bank Continues Its Partnership with Habitat For Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam

City National Bank continues its partnership with Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha and Putnam this month as several employees gave up their Saturday to help a Habitat homebuyer build their home. Fourteen team members from City National signed up for a group volunteer build day, and each spent their Saturday working indoors painting a house that is nearly complete. City National employees have made hands-on contributions a regular part of their support, logging dozens of hours at the bustling construction site in Kanawha County.

 “…it just shows their high-level commitment in helping us create a better community.”

“City [National Bank] employees don’t just work in the communities they serve,” Habitat Development Director William Andreas said in a statement about the volunteers. “They are very organized, and when all the employee volunteers show up on a snowy morning it just shows their high-level commitment in helping us create a better community.”

City National became a long-term Habitat partner in 2004 with a $100,000 four-year pledge gift. That money was put towards Habitat’s campaign “Hammering in the Hills.” That campaign helped to build the North Hills Drive Housing Division in Charleston. Upon the fulfillment of that pledge, City National Bank followed up with two additional donations benefiting the Habitat for Humanity ReStore and ongoing construction jobs in Kanawha and Putnam counties.

Recently, City National Bank became a “Thank God It’s Friday Builders Club” (TGIF) sponsor. This type of partnership with Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam entitles City National employees that come out to volunteer on a one-day construction project several benefits such as on-site lunch, branded clothing and more.

Over the last two years, City National Bank has also been a major sponsor of Habitat’s largest annual fundraiser, “A Taste of … in Charleston.” Just this year, Craig Stillwell, the Executive Vice President of City National Bank, joined Habitat for Humanity’s Board of Directors.

“This year they even took their support a step further…”

“City National Bank has been a consistent donor to the work we do in the area,” said Shawn Means, Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam’s Executive Director. “This year they even took their support a step further and are coming out twice to help build. We got a major donation from the bank to put towards their second build.”

Currently, City National Bank has scheduled two full-day construction builds for 2018.

About Team Builds

There is no donation required to organize or take part in a Team Build. By participating with Habitat for Humanity for a Team Build, your team will play an important role in helping to break the cycle of poverty, strengthening our community, and building a brighter future for a local family. Your team members and company will also be featured on our website and social media platforms. Read more about Team Build Days here: http://hfhkp.org/team-build

To schedule your team build day, click here to see what dates are available. We schedule and track our volunteers through Volunteer Hub,  guiding you and your group through the process signing up and getting organized. However, if you need assistance setting up your build, contact our Development Director, William Andreas, at 304-720-0141 ext. 16 or by email at wandreas@hfhkp.org.

Hello Spring, Goodbye Clutter

It’s time to get motivated after spending the winter in a more restful state. As cold March days give way to mild April nights, more and more people are turning to home projects to break out of their winter hibernation. Spring cleaning is the most common, and easiest, thing you can do now as the weather still warms up. No one really looks forward to spring cleaning, but it helps to think about the final result: a clean and fresh house!

You may feel unsure where to start, but get your spring cleaning started by removing the clutter from your home. It’s as simple as taking stock of what you have and haven’t used lately. Outside of seasonal items, anything that you haven’t used in the last year is probably a safe bet to donate.

Divide your household items into separate piles with “keep”, “toss out”, and “donate” labels to make sure nothing is done away with improperly. It may seem hard at first, but once you get started it you’ll likely be surprised at how much you really don’t need.

Don’t just toss all of your unwanted belongings in the trash. Remember that “donate” pile. A lot of the items that have accumulated in your home are probably still in good shape and could be used by someone else. You can donate your gently used furniture to Habitat for Humanity ReStores. Most ReStores can arrange pickup for large items that won’t fit into your car. They also accept things like light fixtures, lumber, sinks, toilets, bathtubs and home goods.

ReStore Approved Donations Include

Appliances

Antiques

Architectural Items

Framed Art and Mirrors

Cabinets and Countertops

Doors and Windows

Electrical

File Cabinets

Flooring

Furniture (home and office)

Hardware

Home Decorations

ReStore Items Not Accepted

Don’t let the fear of possibly needing an item scare you into keeping things you don’t need—repurpose it so someone else can enjoy it. Donate your items and make a difference for people in your community.

Soring Cleaning Goodbye Clutter

Define Your Legacy

Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam recently founded our Legacy Society to recognize the importance of estate gifts in accomplishing our vision of a world where everyone has a decent place to call home. Our Legacy Society creates new opportunities and preserves our future through planned gifts. These gifts can qualify for significant tax deductions and include bequests, charitable gift annuities and charitable remainder trusts.

Tax BenefitsWhy Include a Bequest in Your Will or Trust?

Naming Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam as a beneficiary in an IRA, life insurance policy, other financial account or in your will is one critical way that you can help provide for future stability and growth.

The reasons that donors make charitable bequests are generally as varied as the donors themselves, but perhaps one common denominator is a sincere desire to give back to their community. Other advantages include:

It’s easy. The easiest way to leave a Legacy Gift and become a Legacy Society member is through your will.

It’s revocable. With a bequest, you are not actually making a gift until your death. Until then, you are free to alter your plans, eliminating the worry that you might make a commitment you could later regret.

It’s tax-smart. Your estate is entitled to an unlimited estate tax charitable deduction for bequests to qualified charitable organizations.

If you have already included Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam in your plans, please let us know so we can thank you!

The names of individuals who donate an estate gift or designate Habitat for Humanity for memorials are recognized on our new Legacy Society plaque hung in the lobby. In addition, individuals who notify us of a future estate or memorial gifts are recognized the same.How to Give

Contact wandreas@hfhkp.org or call 304-720-0141 ext. 16 for more information.

Bequest Provision 
A provision in a will may be made using the following language:

I give, devise, and bequeath to Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam, a non-profit corporation located at 815 Court Street in Charleston, West Virginia, _______ percent of my estate (or the sum of $__________; or ________ percent of the residue of my estate) as an unrestricted gift.

It’s that simple!

Habitat Teaches Home Builders How to be Safe on the Jobsite

Whether on the roof nailing shingles, using power tools on the ground or painting the inside of a closet, Habitat for Humanity strives to keep its volunteers safe.

Several homebuilders met in Charleston in January at BrickStreet Insurance. They were there for a quarterly meeting of the Home Builders’ Association of West Virginia. The focus: preventing workplace falls. Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam was invited to speak about its exceptional volunteer safety practices, in particular its use of the Horizontal Under-eave Guardrail System known as HUGS: a truss mounted roof top safety guardrail system.

Using volunteer labor can be quite a dilemma when it comes to keeping workers on the work site safe. One of the most dangerous areas of a volunteer work site is a roof. Because of that, Habitat uses HUGS fall prevention railing on all houses it builds.

At the January 18th meeting, Bill “Tiny” Hanshaw, Habitat for Humanity’s construction supervisor, spoke to over 40 homebuilders detailing the HUGS safety guardrails he uses to protect Habitat volunteers. Hanshaw’s presentation focused on the ease of using HUGS guardrails to provide maximum worker safety. As he spoke, he told the home builders that HUGS are a worthy investment.

“Safety is always Habitat’s first priority because we work with volunteers.”

HUGS Railing Safety “We have been using the HUGS system for years now and believe it is great. I couldn’t imagine putting volunteers on a roof without it,” Hanshaw said. He went on to say as a construction supervisor he has always preferred the HUGS system over safety nets and harnesses because HUGS are stable, more reliable and can be reused for years.

Hanshaw told the group that many Habitat for Humanity affiliates across the country prefer the system because it does not interfere with roofing, wall finishing, window, siding or other installations, is compliant with fall protection standards set forth by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and gives workers the confidence to safely work on roofing projects at Habitat build sites.

Hanshaw ended his presentation by saying that HUGS are great for anyone that builds houses – not just volunteer organizations – who want to provide a safe working environment for everyone. “Instead of requiring special training and fall prevention equipment, HUGS can be put up easily and at a low cost, providing the safest possible work environment.”

Financial Planning: The Cornerstone of Homeownership

As future homeowners partner with Habitat for Humanity to build a place they can call home, they work hundreds of hours to secure a better future for themselves and their families. Those future homeowners work to build their home — and the homes of others — alongside volunteers, but they also take steps that will help ensure their long-term success once they are in the home. Homeowners will not stay homeowners if they do not learn to take charge of their financial life. 76% of Homeowners live paycheck to paycheck.

All future Habitat homeowners participate in financial education classes that help them develop a solid foundation, often before the building process even begins.

Laura, a Habitat homeowner who has lived in the home she helped build for approximately a year and a half, says Habitat for Humanity’s classes can have a long-lasting, generational impact. “They set you up for success,” she says, “creating that sense of security that comes not only from homeownership, but savings and investments.”

We’d like you to join us for our next “Financial Peace University,” – a nine-lesson course focusing on money management taught by financial guru, Dave Ramsey and facilitated by Janie Hamilton. Janie is a Financial Peace University graduate, and she lives the methods learned through the course. She will present Dave’s tried and true method to walk you through the basics of budgeting, dumping debt, planning for the future and much more.

The best way to jump-start your financial planning and to see the most significant life-change is to join our local group and experience the class with other people. Classes typically meet for two hours once a week for nine weeks. The accountability and motivation you receive from discussing the lessons and meeting people face-to-face is the key to changing your life! Our classes start up in January.

“When we sit down, the very first class, we have them create a budget and list all of their outgoing payments and all of their incoming money each month so that they can get hands-on and actually see what’s going on,” says Janie Hamilton, course facilitator.

When you start “Financial Peace University,” you get immediate access to your online account which includes video of Dave’s teaching as well as additional reading and tools to help you win with money! You get one year of online access included when you purchase the course materials. Go through the video lessons and join our local group Monday nights starting in January for extra encouragement.

Schedule & Lessons

• Lesson 1 – January 08, 2018 – Super Saving
• Lesson 2 – January 15, 2018 – Relating With Money
• Lesson 3 – January 22, 2018 – Cash Flow Planning
• Lesson 4 – January 29, 2018 – Dumping Debt
• Lesson 5 – February 05, 2018 – Buyer Beware
• Lesson 6 – February 12, 2018 – The Role of Insurance
• Lesson 7 – February 19, 2018 – Retirement and College Planning
• Lesson 8 – February 26, 2018 – Real Estate and Mortgages
• Lesson 9 – March 05, 2018 – The Great Misunderstanding

For more information, including cost, or to purchase your class materials and register, click here: https://fpu.com/1050847
You can also contact Janie Hamilton directly with your questions at 304-720-0141 ext. 18 or email Janie at janie@hfhkp.org.

1 Year of Support

 

Click HERE to make a secure, online financial contribution.