Close

Tag Archive for: do-it-yourself

Making Dollars and Sense out of Caulking

Preserve Your Biggest Investment – Your Home

When most people think of basic home maintenance, caulking may not make the list. It should. Caulking doesn’t just add an aesthetic finish to your home. The sealing compound is used to close up gaps against air, dust and insects. It provides a seal from the outdoor elements. Also, caulk protects your indoor surfaces by stopping water from seeping into cracks.

If you live in an older home, now is the time to inspect around your windows, doors and bathrooms. Older caulking is prone to peel away and chip, leaving your home exposed to insects and the elements.  Unmaintained caulk also reduces your home’s overall energy efficiency.

According to the Consumer Federation of America, sealing unwanted leaks around your home is an excellent way to cut home energy costs and decrease your household carbon footprint. Also, sealing cracks and crevices around your home puts less strain on appliances and can save time, money and hassle by preventing major repairs. Additionally, increasing the lifetime of homes and appliances also puts less waste and pollution into landfills.

Caulking Can Be Intimidating

Choosing the right caulk from a selection of tubes spread across a 10-foot wall display can be downright intimidating. A single tube of caulk can cost $1.50 to $14. Regardless of what the caulk is labeled, its ingredients are the most important consideration in determining what it’s best suited for. What you want the caulk to adhere to and where you’ll want to use it determine the caulk you buy. types of caulk

Caulking joints around doors and windows requires a sealant that is flexible and long-lasting, adheres to siding (wood, aluminum and vinyl), resists extreme weather conditions and, if it’s not painted over, withstands direct sunlight. To seal flashing around a chimney, the caulk must adhere to masonry, roofing shingles and metal flashing and stand up to the elements unpainted. The warm, wet conditions of a bathroom require that a caulk resist mildew and moisture.

Learn What You Need to Know to Do the Job Yourself – Easily

Don’t let intimidation stop you from taking on a project yourself.  Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam is here to teach you the knowledge you need to choose the right product, and give you the skills needed to get the job done right.  We’re hosting a two-hour workshop dedicated to the art of caulking on Thursday, October 26, 2017 at 5:30 p.m.. You will learn from Darrin Huffman of Builders First Source all of his personal tips and tricks to get your job done right. Also, this will be a hands-on workshop. You will get the chance to work with caulk adhesives up close and put into practice the best techniques to apply it to multiple surfaces.

For more information or to register for Habitat for Humanity’s upcoming “Art of Caulking” workshop, visit our events page by clicking here. You can also email our Education Program Coordinator, Janie Hamilton, at janie@hfhkp.org to register for the workshop.

For more on Habitat for Humanity’s education program, click here.

 

Learning to Reuse & Refurbish Old Furniture

Many of us find a piece of used furniture that speaks to us, but it may not match the décor in our homes. That is where Rich “The Refurburator” Chapman comes in. Chapman owns “Refurburator” in Kanawha City. His store offers custom furniture painting, interior design, chalk paint classes and estate sales. He also enjoys giving back to his community by volunteering.

Chalk Paint Classes DemonstrationSince opening his store in 2016, Chapman makes time to volunteer with Habitat for Humanity. Partnering with our Master Homeowner Program, “The Refurburator” teaches classes in The John L. Dickinson Family Homeowner Education and Community Center.Class Participants Painting

“I have always known how Habitat helps people in the community with housing and home education,” Chapman says. “This is my way of helping too.”

 

Saturday, July 22 marks the third class Chapman has taught in partnership with Habitat for Humanity. Eleven participants from Kanawha and Putnam counties signed up to learn how to take old furniture, such as tables and chairs, and give it new life. The class members worked with Dixie Belle chalk paint and a special finishing wax over the course of three hours to completely transform their pieces.

Chapman insists that every old chair, table and wardrobe can be made new again, saying, “a great way to keep these items out of the landfill is to repurpose them into something more useful.”

The chalk paint that class members used is very forgiving, according to Chapman. A lot of times he uses it to create an aged appearance on pieces he sells from his shop, saying the paint can be distressed with little effort. As for how long the class member’s renewed furniture will last, Chapman says that under normal conditions, if it is waxed, it will last for years. “That’s what I like about Dixie Belle paints. They last for a really long time, unlike latex paints that can chip and peel if you put something like a lamp on them.”

Chapman plans to host more classes at Habitat for Humanity’s community center in the future. Whatever your skill level, the projects his classes take on are a perfect match for anyone — from a novice do-it-yourselfer to an expert crafter.

If you’re interested in checking out Chapman’s “Refurburator” store, it is located at 3706 MacCorkle Avenue, SE, in Kanawha City.

For more information about our upcoming classes, or to learn how you can host your own workshops in The John L. Dickinson Family Homeowner Education and Community Center — contact Janie Hamilton at 304-720-0141 ext. 18. You can also email Janie at Janie@hfhkp.org.

 

 

Reuse Refurbish Old Furniture Classes Saturday July 22 Class

Class members wipe down their furniture to clean any residue off — no sanding needed — before applying the first coat of paint.

 

 

 

 

 

Chapman takes time to work with each class member — making sure there are no questions or problems with the painting process.

Click HERE to make a secure, online financial contribution.