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The Master Homeowner Program

Master Homeowner 2018
A unique education program creating successful homeowners.

When Terri bought her first home, she quickly realized that she had no idea how to operate a house. Terri learned quickly how much she didn’t know about being a homeowner. She had no idea that she needed to change her furnace filter until after a costly repair visit from the HVAC repairman. She didn’t know how to winterize her home, who to call if she had an electrical problem or how do diagnose a plumbing leak.

Master Homeowner“When I heard that Habitat Homebuyers receive in-depth training on how to be a successful homeowner, I thought, ‘Why hasn’t anyone offered that to people like me?'” 

Terri’s story is common. People who buy a home through conventional means receive no training in the functions and operations of their new home. The fortunate ones have a friend or a relative who can show them the ropes, but many more are left adrift without any direction or do-it-yourself know-how. By knowing how a home operates, homeowners are able to maintain the value of their home and save money by preventing costly repairs.

Curriculum Overview

The centerpiece of the Master Homeowner Program is a series of nine classes held weekly in Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam’s Homeowner Education and Community Center. In addition to the nine classes, the program also requires participants to complete a nine-week financial and debt management course: Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University. Homeowners are required to perform home maintenance tasks as homework to demonstrate learned skills.

To earn a Master Homeowner Certificate, homeowners must complete each of the following hands-on classes:

Homeowner’s Toolbox:
Homeowners learn what basic tools are needed for common tasks in and around the house and learn how to use the tools properly.

Home & Neighborhood Safety:
Homeowners learn to identify potential threats to their property and learn the best practices in reporting and deterring security risks.

save money

Neighborhood Relations:
Homeowners learn the importance of forming positive relationships with their close neighbors and the wider community, thus being empowered to improve their neighborhood.

Legal & Insurance Issues:
Homeowners learn from an attorney how to make the best insurance decisions, why estate planning is important and how not to become a victim of predatory lending. Homebuyers learn about the legal documents they will sign when they purchase a home.

Home Electrical Basics: Homeowners learn the functions of a basic residential electrical system. This class teaches practical electrical safety, energy usage in the home and how to hire an electrician if one is needed.

save money

Home Maintenance:
Homeowners learn why it is important to maintain their home and the consequences if they do not. Students learn where to begin, what to look for, and in some circumstances how to perform maintenance that will keep the value of their investment intact.

Home Fire Safety & Prevention:
Homeowners learn the most common causes of house fires, how to prevent fires and what to do in case of fire. This class teaches participants, hands on, how to use fire extinguishers and properly place them in the home.

Basic Household Plumbing:
Homeowners learn how their home plumbing system works, where to check for leaks and how to prevent clogs. This class identifies common problems with household plumbing systems.

Home Energy Efficiency:
Homeowners learn energy efficiency concepts, the advantages of controlling the conditioned air in their homes and how to identify and eliminate energy waste.

Cost to Participants

In order to make the Master Homeowner Program available to a wide audience, there is a fee to cover the cost of printed materials pertaining to each class. Each class costs $10.

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Classes are offered in two cycles per year. If you miss a class during the current fall 2018 session — and that’s okay — then you will automatically be registered for the next cycle of classes.

Program Evaluation

The Master Homeowner Program curriculum is evaluated after each cycle of classes using two evaluation methods: after-class surveys and comparison of pre and post-class test scores. It is the goal of the program to ensure that only effective instructors are utilized, and that all materials appear relevant to the participants. If instructors or class information is deemed sub-standard, improvements are made.

How the Master Homeowner Program Came to Be

The Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam staff and Board of Directors committed itself in 2014 to offering the most comprehensive homeownership education possible. Not wishing to reinvent the wheel, Habitat’s staff began reviewing commercially available education resources, but found all of them lacking. While there were many educational resources marketed under the general heading of “homeownership education,” they were all primarily concerned with leading someone through the process of buying a home, covering topics like finding a realtor and securing a mortgage. The small amount of home maintenance training in those courses imparted very little practical information. After an exhaustive search, Habitat decided to create its own program. janie hamilton

The development of the program began with the assistance of adult education professionals who helped Habitat staff understand the basics of adult education and the importance of a professionally designed and administered program. Realizing that no one on its staff had the requisite skills to design and run such a program, Habitat hired Janie Hamilton, who had a strong background in adult education.

Janie spent the the better part of a year developing the program from scratch. Working with an advisory panel that included individuals from disciplines related to homeownership and adult education, she established learning objectives and mapped those objectives to classroom instruction materials. Pre and post tests were developed to provide program effectiveness metrics. Nine key homeownership elements were identified as the core of the program. These were developed into classes that provide homeowners with the basic skills needed to maintain the condition and value of their largest investment: their home.

Recognizing that homeownership training could be a benefit Habitat could offer to the entire community – not just its own homebuyers – The Master Homeowner Program was opened in 2016 to allow any current or aspiring homeowner to participate. Most Master Homeowner Program participants have been people outside the Habitat for Humanity program.

For more information on our classes, contact Janie Hamilton.
304-720-0141 ext. 18
janie@hfhkp.org.

Fall 2018 Master Homeowner Classes

Master Homeowner 2018
A unique education program creating successful homeowners.

When Terri bought her first home, she quickly realized that she had no idea how to operate a house. Terri learned quickly how much she didn’t know about being a homeowner. She had no idea that she needed to change her furnace filter until after a costly repair visit from the HVAC repairman. She didn’t know how to winterize her home, who to call if she had an electrical problem or how do diagnose a plumbing leak.

Master Homeowner“When I heard that Habitat Homebuyers receive in-depth training on how to be a successful homeowner, I thought, ‘Why hasn’t anyone offered that to people like me?'” 

Terri’s story is common. People who buy a home through conventional means receive no training in the functions and operations of their new home. The fortunate ones have a friend or a relative who can show them the ropes, but many more are left adrift without any direction or do-it-yourself know-how. By knowing how a home operates, homeowners are able to maintain the value of their home and save money by preventing costly repairs.

Recognizing that homeownership training could be a benefit Habitat could offer to the entire community – not just its own homebuyers – The Master Homeowner Program was opened in 2016 to allow any current or aspiring homeowner to participate. Most Master Homeowner Program participants have been people outside the Habitat for Humanity program.
To register for the complete nine-class Master Homeowner course, CLICK HERE. You may also register for just the classes that interest you.

To earn a Master Homeowner Certificate, homeowners must complete each of the following hands-on classes:

Homeowner’s Toolbox:
Homeowners learn what basic tools are needed for common tasks in and around the house and learn how to use the tools properly.
Monday, September 10, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Home & Neighborhood Safety:
Homeowners learn to identify potential threats to their property and learn the best practices in reporting and deterring security risks.
Monday, September 17, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

save money

Neighborhood Relations:
Homeowners learn the importance of forming positive relationships with their close neighbors and the wider community, thus being empowered to improve their neighborhood.
Monday, September 24, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Legal & Insurance Issues:
Homeowners learn from an attorney how to make the best insurance decisions, why estate planning is important and how not to become a victim of predatory lending. Homebuyers learn about the legal documents they will sign when they purchase a home.
Monday, October 1, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Home Electrical Basics: Homeowners learn the functions of a basic residential electrical system. This class teaches practical electrical safety, energy usage in the home and how to hire an electrician if one is needed.
Monday, October 8, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

save money

Home Maintenance:
Homeowners learn why it is important to maintain their home and the consequences if they do not. Students learn where to begin, what to look for, and in some circumstances how to perform maintenance that will keep the value of their investment intact.
Monday, October 15, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Home Fire Safety & Prevention:
Homeowners learn the most common causes of house fires, how to prevent fires and what to do in case of fire. This class teaches participants, hands on, how to use fire extinguishers and properly place them in the home.
Monday, October 22, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Basic Household Plumbing:
Homeowners learn how their home plumbing system works, where to check for leaks and how to prevent clogs. This class identifies common problems with household plumbing systems.
Monday, October 29, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Home Energy Efficiency:
Homeowners learn energy efficiency concepts, the advantages of controlling the conditioned air in their homes and how to identify and eliminate energy waste.
Monday, November 5, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

save money

Cost to Participants

In order to make the Master Homeowner Program available to a wide audience, there is a fee to cover the cost of printed materials pertaining to each class. Each class costs $10.

Classes are offered in two cycles per year. If you miss a class during the current fall 2018 session — and that’s okay — then you will automatically be registered for the next cycle in spring 2019.

To register for the complete nine-class Master Homeowner course, CLICK HERE.

janie hamilton

For more information on our classes, contact Janie Hamilton.

304-720-0141 ext. 18

janie@hfhkp.org.

Habitat for Humanity’s Community Center

Community Center Logo Rental Venue

Are you looking for a rental venue to hold classes and meetings? Habitat for Humanity has the place for you! The John L. Dickinson Family Homeowner Education and Community Center in Charleston is a spacious and comfortable rental facility available for both public and private use.

The John L. Dickinson Family Homeowner Education and Community Center Rental Venue

The Homeowner Education and Community Center accommodates 200 people seated presentation style or 104 seated at round tables. The 2,210 sq. foot center’s maximum capacity is 225.

The community center is located at 815 Court Street — diagonally across from Greens Feed and Seed on the corner of Court Street and Piedmont Road. There is a spacious parking lot on site providing over 80 parking spots.

When looking for a rental venue to host meetings, receptions, workshops, and presentations, consider using the John L. Dickinson Family Homeowner Education and Community Center. The center is only 4.7 miles from Yeager Airport and .01 miles from downtown Charleston.

Habitat for Humanity’s Master Homeowner Program and Habitat ReStore’s do-it-yourself workshops all take place in the newly renovated center.

The Community Room Includes:

200 chairs
13 round 72” tables
4 rectangular 30” x 72” tables
Projection screen and ceiling mounted projector
Whiteboard
Kitchen (sink, fridge, microwave, Bunn® coffee maker) and wash basins
Public bathrooms
Wireless internet access
Local original art (shows change quarterly)
Storage closets for groups that have reoccurring events

If your event/meeting/workshop is open to the public, please let us know; we will help promote it by utilizing our website calendar, Facebook page, in-ReStore display and email distribution list.

For questions, please contact:
Janie Hamilton
304-720-0141 ext. 18
Janie@hfhkp.org

Community Center Rental Venue Floor Plan

Learning to Reuse & Refurbish Old Furniture

Many of us find a piece of used furniture that speaks to us, but it may not match the décor in our homes. That is where Rich “The Refurburator” Chapman comes in. Chapman owns “Refurburator” in Kanawha City. His store offers custom furniture painting, interior design, chalk paint classes and estate sales. He also enjoys giving back to his community by volunteering.

Chalk Paint Classes DemonstrationSince opening his store in 2016, Chapman makes time to volunteer with Habitat for Humanity. Partnering with our Master Homeowner Program, “The Refurburator” teaches classes in The John L. Dickinson Family Homeowner Education and Community Center.Class Participants Painting

“I have always known how Habitat helps people in the community with housing and home education,” Chapman says. “This is my way of helping too.”

 

Saturday, July 22 marks the third class Chapman has taught in partnership with Habitat for Humanity. Eleven participants from Kanawha and Putnam counties signed up to learn how to take old furniture, such as tables and chairs, and give it new life. The class members worked with Dixie Belle chalk paint and a special finishing wax over the course of three hours to completely transform their pieces.

Chapman insists that every old chair, table and wardrobe can be made new again, saying, “a great way to keep these items out of the landfill is to repurpose them into something more useful.”

The chalk paint that class members used is very forgiving, according to Chapman. A lot of times he uses it to create an aged appearance on pieces he sells from his shop, saying the paint can be distressed with little effort. As for how long the class member’s renewed furniture will last, Chapman says that under normal conditions, if it is waxed, it will last for years. “That’s what I like about Dixie Belle paints. They last for a really long time, unlike latex paints that can chip and peel if you put something like a lamp on them.”

Chapman plans to host more classes at Habitat for Humanity’s community center in the future. Whatever your skill level, the projects his classes take on are a perfect match for anyone — from a novice do-it-yourselfer to an expert crafter.

If you’re interested in checking out Chapman’s “Refurburator” store, it is located at 3706 MacCorkle Avenue, SE, in Kanawha City.

For more information about our upcoming classes, or to learn how you can host your own workshops in The John L. Dickinson Family Homeowner Education and Community Center — contact Janie Hamilton at 304-720-0141 ext. 18. You can also email Janie at Janie@hfhkp.org.

 

 

Reuse Refurbish Old Furniture Classes Saturday July 22 Class

Class members wipe down their furniture to clean any residue off — no sanding needed — before applying the first coat of paint.

 

 

 

 

 

Chapman takes time to work with each class member — making sure there are no questions or problems with the painting process.

Click HERE to make a secure, online financial contribution.