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Making Dollars and Sense out of Caulking

Preserve Your Biggest Investment – Your Home

When most people think of basic home maintenance, caulking may not make the list. It should. Caulking doesn’t just add an aesthetic finish to your home. The sealing compound is used to close up gaps against air, dust and insects. It provides a seal from the outdoor elements. Also, caulk protects your indoor surfaces by stopping water from seeping into cracks.

If you live in an older home, now is the time to inspect around your windows, doors and bathrooms. Older caulking is prone to peel away and chip, leaving your home exposed to insects and the elements.  Unmaintained caulk also reduces your home’s overall energy efficiency.

According to the Consumer Federation of America, sealing unwanted leaks around your home is an excellent way to cut home energy costs and decrease your household carbon footprint. Also, sealing cracks and crevices around your home puts less strain on appliances and can save time, money and hassle by preventing major repairs. Additionally, increasing the lifetime of homes and appliances also puts less waste and pollution into landfills.

Caulking Can Be Intimidating

Choosing the right caulk from a selection of tubes spread across a 10-foot wall display can be downright intimidating. A single tube of caulk can cost $1.50 to $14. Regardless of what the caulk is labeled, its ingredients are the most important consideration in determining what it’s best suited for. What you want the caulk to adhere to and where you’ll want to use it determine the caulk you buy. types of caulk

Caulking joints around doors and windows requires a sealant that is flexible and long-lasting, adheres to siding (wood, aluminum and vinyl), resists extreme weather conditions and, if it’s not painted over, withstands direct sunlight. To seal flashing around a chimney, the caulk must adhere to masonry, roofing shingles and metal flashing and stand up to the elements unpainted. The warm, wet conditions of a bathroom require that a caulk resist mildew and moisture.

Learn What You Need to Know to Do the Job Yourself – Easily

Don’t let intimidation stop you from taking on a project yourself.  Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam is here to teach you the knowledge you need to choose the right product, and give you the skills needed to get the job done right.  We’re hosting a two-hour workshop dedicated to the art of caulking on Thursday, October 26, 2017 at 5:30 p.m.. You will learn from Darrin Huffman of Builders First Source all of his personal tips and tricks to get your job done right. Also, this will be a hands-on workshop. You will get the chance to work with caulk adhesives up close and put into practice the best techniques to apply it to multiple surfaces.

For more information or to register for Habitat for Humanity’s upcoming “Art of Caulking” workshop, visit our events page by clicking here. You can also email our Education Program Coordinator, Janie Hamilton, at janie@hfhkp.org to register for the workshop.

For more on Habitat for Humanity’s education program, click here.

 

Habitat for Humanity’s Community Center

Community Center Logo Rental Venue

Are you looking for a rental venue to hold classes and meetings? Habitat for Humanity has the place for you! The John L. Dickinson Family Homeowner Education and Community Center in Charleston is a spacious and comfortable rental facility available for both public and private use.

The John L. Dickinson Family Homeowner Education and Community Center Rental Venue

The Homeowner Education and Community Center accommodates 200 people seated presentation style or 104 seated at round tables. The 2,210 sq. foot center’s maximum capacity is 225.

The community center is located at 815 Court Street — diagonally across from Greens Feed and Seed on the corner of Court Street and Piedmont Road. There is a spacious parking lot on site providing over 80 parking spots.

When looking for a rental venue to host meetings, receptions, workshops, and presentations, consider using the John L. Dickinson Family Homeowner Education and Community Center. The center is only 4.7 miles from Yeager Airport and .01 miles from downtown Charleston.

Habitat for Humanity’s Master Homeowner Program and Habitat ReStore’s do-it-yourself workshops all take place in the newly renovated center.

The Community Room Includes:

200 chairs
13 round 72” tables
4 rectangular 30” x 72” tables
Projection screen and ceiling mounted projector
Whiteboard
Kitchen (sink, fridge, microwave, Bunn® coffee maker) and wash basins
Public bathrooms
Wireless internet access
Local original art (shows change quarterly)
Storage closets for groups that have reoccurring events

If your event/meeting/workshop is open to the public, please let us know; we will help promote it by utilizing our website calendar, Facebook page, in-ReStore display and email distribution list.

For questions, please contact:
Janie Hamilton
304-720-0141 ext. 18
Janie@hfhkp.org

Community Center Rental Venue Floor Plan

Eliminating Debt for Financial Peace

Habitat for Humanity empowers future homeowners to successfully own and maintain a home. One such way we achieve this is by teaching our Habitat partners about financial responsibility. We use a proven course that started out as a small class taught in a church. From that, Financial Peace University was born. Twenty years after the course was developed, its creator, Dave Ramsey, continues to teach people God’s way of handling money. Lisa, a recent course graduate says, “Dave explains so much about money and how to handle it the way God intended. You will learn a lot about money.”

Ramsey is a personal money-management expert and popular national radio personality. His seven best-selling books – Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover, EntreLeadership, The Complete Guide to Money, Legacy Journey and Smart Money Smart Kids – have sold more than 10 million copies combined.Debt Free Course Graduates

Through video teaching, class discussions and interactive small-group activities, the Financial Peace University course presents practical, biblical steps to win with money. You’ll learn how to walk out of debt, build significant savings, and leave a lasting legacy for your family, church and community. You will also learn the truth about credit cards and credit bureaus, how marketing can sway your spending decisions, what insurance you actually need, and how to plan for college and retirement.

The cost of the nine-week course is $75 dollars. Habitat homebuyers get a rebate once they complete all nine classes. Kelli, a current Habitat homebuyer says, “The great thing is you pay for the class, but get back so much more.”

The course is structured around a seven-step plan.

  • Step 1: Save $1000 in a beginner emergency fund
  • Step 2: Pay off all debt, except mortgage
  • Step 3: Put three to six months of expenses in savings
  • Step 4: Invest 15% of your household income into retirement
  • Step 5: Save for your children’s college
  • Step 6: Pay off your mortgage early
  • Step 7: Build Wealth and Give

Course instructor, Janie Hamilton, says that each step is achievable, but moving from step one to step seven takes time. “It can takes three to four years before you make it past step three, but it can be done,” Hamilton explains.

The Financial Peace University course is offered twice a year on Monday nights. If you miss a class, you can make it up during the next course offering. Right now, we are in the process of scheduling our winter 2018 Financial Peace University course.

“Tough it out through the foggy moments. The payoff is larger than you could imaging. When you are diligent and listen to God’s command, not only will you change your life, but the lives of people around you. Stay the course.” – Jennifer, 2017 Financial Peace University Graduate

Habitat for Humanity also teaches homeowners other practical skills needed to maintain a home for years to come. Our Master Homeowner Program is the only one of its kind in the country. It was developed right here in West Virginia with the needs of Habitat for Humanity homebuyers in mind, but it’s open to anyone.

For more information on our Master Homeowner Program and how you can learn to maintain your home, CLICK HERE.

Learning to Reuse & Refurbish Old Furniture

Many of us find a piece of used furniture that speaks to us, but it may not match the décor in our homes. That is where Rich “The Refurburator” Chapman comes in. Chapman owns “Refurburator” in Kanawha City. His store offers custom furniture painting, interior design, chalk paint classes and estate sales. He also enjoys giving back to his community by volunteering.

Chalk Paint Classes DemonstrationSince opening his store in 2016, Chapman makes time to volunteer with Habitat for Humanity. Partnering with our Master Homeowner Program, “The Refurburator” teaches classes in The John L. Dickinson Family Homeowner Education and Community Center.Class Participants Painting

“I have always known how Habitat helps people in the community with housing and home education,” Chapman says. “This is my way of helping too.”

 

Saturday, July 22 marks the third class Chapman has taught in partnership with Habitat for Humanity. Eleven participants from Kanawha and Putnam counties signed up to learn how to take old furniture, such as tables and chairs, and give it new life. The class members worked with Dixie Belle chalk paint and a special finishing wax over the course of three hours to completely transform their pieces.

Chapman insists that every old chair, table and wardrobe can be made new again, saying, “a great way to keep these items out of the landfill is to repurpose them into something more useful.”

The chalk paint that class members used is very forgiving, according to Chapman. A lot of times he uses it to create an aged appearance on pieces he sells from his shop, saying the paint can be distressed with little effort. As for how long the class member’s renewed furniture will last, Chapman says that under normal conditions, if it is waxed, it will last for years. “That’s what I like about Dixie Belle paints. They last for a really long time, unlike latex paints that can chip and peel if you put something like a lamp on them.”

Chapman plans to host more classes at Habitat for Humanity’s community center in the future. Whatever your skill level, the projects his classes take on are a perfect match for anyone — from a novice do-it-yourselfer to an expert crafter.

If you’re interested in checking out Chapman’s “Refurburator” store, it is located at 3706 MacCorkle Avenue, SE, in Kanawha City.

For more information about our upcoming classes, or to learn how you can host your own workshops in The John L. Dickinson Family Homeowner Education and Community Center — contact Janie Hamilton at 304-720-0141 ext. 18. You can also email Janie at Janie@hfhkp.org.

 

 

Reuse Refurbish Old Furniture Classes Saturday July 22 Class

Class members wipe down their furniture to clean any residue off — no sanding needed — before applying the first coat of paint.

 

 

 

 

 

Chapman takes time to work with each class member — making sure there are no questions or problems with the painting process.

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