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The Master Homeowner Program

Master Homeowner 2018
A unique education program creating successful homeowners.

When Terri bought her first home, she quickly realized that she had no idea how to operate a house. Terri learned quickly how much she didn’t know about being a homeowner. She had no idea that she needed to change her furnace filter until after a costly repair visit from the HVAC repairman. She didn’t know how to winterize her home, who to call if she had an electrical problem or how do diagnose a plumbing leak.

Master Homeowner“When I heard that Habitat Homebuyers receive in-depth training on how to be a successful homeowner, I thought, ‘Why hasn’t anyone offered that to people like me?'” 

Terri’s story is common. People who buy a home through conventional means receive no training in the functions and operations of their new home. The fortunate ones have a friend or a relative who can show them the ropes, but many more are left adrift without any direction or do-it-yourself know-how. By knowing how a home operates, homeowners are able to maintain the value of their home and save money by preventing costly repairs.

Curriculum Overview

The centerpiece of the Master Homeowner Program is a series of nine classes held weekly in Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam’s Homeowner Education and Community Center. In addition to the nine classes, the program also requires participants to complete a nine-week financial and debt management course: Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University. Homeowners are required to perform home maintenance tasks as homework to demonstrate learned skills.

To earn a Master Homeowner Certificate, homeowners must complete each of the following hands-on classes:

Homeowner’s Toolbox:
Homeowners learn what basic tools are needed for common tasks in and around the house and learn how to use the tools properly.

Home & Neighborhood Safety:
Homeowners learn to identify potential threats to their property and learn the best practices in reporting and deterring security risks.

save money

Neighborhood Relations:
Homeowners learn the importance of forming positive relationships with their close neighbors and the wider community, thus being empowered to improve their neighborhood.

Legal & Insurance Issues:
Homeowners learn from an attorney how to make the best insurance decisions, why estate planning is important and how not to become a victim of predatory lending. Homebuyers learn about the legal documents they will sign when they purchase a home.

Home Electrical Basics: Homeowners learn the functions of a basic residential electrical system. This class teaches practical electrical safety, energy usage in the home and how to hire an electrician if one is needed.

save money

Home Maintenance:
Homeowners learn why it is important to maintain their home and the consequences if they do not. Students learn where to begin, what to look for, and in some circumstances how to perform maintenance that will keep the value of their investment intact.

Home Fire Safety & Prevention:
Homeowners learn the most common causes of house fires, how to prevent fires and what to do in case of fire. This class teaches participants, hands on, how to use fire extinguishers and properly place them in the home.

Basic Household Plumbing:
Homeowners learn how their home plumbing system works, where to check for leaks and how to prevent clogs. This class identifies common problems with household plumbing systems.

Home Energy Efficiency:
Homeowners learn energy efficiency concepts, the advantages of controlling the conditioned air in their homes and how to identify and eliminate energy waste.

Cost to Participants

In order to make the Master Homeowner Program available to a wide audience, there is a fee to cover the cost of printed materials pertaining to each class. Each class costs $10.

save money

Classes are offered in two cycles per year. If you miss a class during the current fall 2018 session — and that’s okay — then you will automatically be registered for the next cycle of classes.

Program Evaluation

The Master Homeowner Program curriculum is evaluated after each cycle of classes using two evaluation methods: after-class surveys and comparison of pre and post-class test scores. It is the goal of the program to ensure that only effective instructors are utilized, and that all materials appear relevant to the participants. If instructors or class information is deemed sub-standard, improvements are made.

How the Master Homeowner Program Came to Be

The Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam staff and Board of Directors committed itself in 2014 to offering the most comprehensive homeownership education possible. Not wishing to reinvent the wheel, Habitat’s staff began reviewing commercially available education resources, but found all of them lacking. While there were many educational resources marketed under the general heading of “homeownership education,” they were all primarily concerned with leading someone through the process of buying a home, covering topics like finding a realtor and securing a mortgage. The small amount of home maintenance training in those courses imparted very little practical information. After an exhaustive search, Habitat decided to create its own program. janie hamilton

The development of the program began with the assistance of adult education professionals who helped Habitat staff understand the basics of adult education and the importance of a professionally designed and administered program. Realizing that no one on its staff had the requisite skills to design and run such a program, Habitat hired Janie Hamilton, who had a strong background in adult education.

Janie spent the the better part of a year developing the program from scratch. Working with an advisory panel that included individuals from disciplines related to homeownership and adult education, she established learning objectives and mapped those objectives to classroom instruction materials. Pre and post tests were developed to provide program effectiveness metrics. Nine key homeownership elements were identified as the core of the program. These were developed into classes that provide homeowners with the basic skills needed to maintain the condition and value of their largest investment: their home.

Recognizing that homeownership training could be a benefit Habitat could offer to the entire community – not just its own homebuyers – The Master Homeowner Program was opened in 2016 to allow any current or aspiring homeowner to participate. Most Master Homeowner Program participants have been people outside the Habitat for Humanity program.

For more information on our classes, contact Janie Hamilton.
304-720-0141 ext. 18
janie@hfhkp.org.

The Kanawha Valley Board of Realtors Continues its Partnership with Habitat

The Kanawha Valley Board of Realtors Donates $1,000 and dozens of volunteers to help Habitat wrap up its 2018 construction season.

Over two dozen members of the Kanawha Valley Board of Realtors are working with Habitat for Humanity right now to get the inside of a new home ready for a local homebuyer. The volunteers are installing drywall along North Hills Drive in Charleston. This is the third year that the Board has partnered with Habitat and made a sizable donation to purchase construction materials.Realtors

The Kanawha Valley Board of Realtors is a local real estate trade association which represents hundreds of local Realtors, appraisers and affiliate members throughout the Kanawha Valley. KVBR provides leadership for the Realtor community by protecting the interests of its members, promoting their value to the real estate consumer, setting its members to the highest standards of professionalism and advocating private property rights.

Ann Boggs, Executive Vice President of the Kanawha Valley Board of Realtors, encourages Board members to participate annually in projects that help the community. Habitat for Humanity’s Development Director, William Andreas, has worked with the Board for years to help its members get involved. “The mission of Habitat isn’t just to build houses, it’s to build relationships and offer members of the community a meaningful way to give back and get involved,” Andreas says.

The Grainger Foundation Donates $5,000 to Habitat

The Grainger Foundation donates $5,000 to help a Habitat Homebuyer build their future home.

The Grainger Foundation has awarded Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam with a $5,000 check to be used on the construction of a new home on North Hills Drive in Charleston. The Foundation has also partnered with Habitat to become a sponsor for Habitat’s upcoming fundraising event, “Building Habitat’s Future.” That event will take place at Edgewood Country Club on November 8.

This new house being built will benefit a local community member who successfully completes the partnership program required by Habitat for Humanity. In addition to a down payment and zero-interest monthly mortgage payments, Habitat Homebuyers invest hundreds of hours of his or her own labor in building their house and the houses of others. In addition to investing his or her “sweat equity,” the local person selected for this home will also fulfill other requirements, including completion of Habitat’s Master Homeowner Program.

Habitat Check Presentation GraingerThe Grainger Foundation and Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam have a solid, long-standing relationship. The Foundation has made monetary donations to Habitat in the past, and Grainer also acts as a vendor for some of Habitat’s construction supplies.

Grainger’s Managers, Contact Center Directors and other upper management work to identify charitable organizations in their local communities and make grant recommendations to The Grainger Foundation ranging from $2,500 up to $10,000. As a result of recommendations submitted throughout 2017, The Grainger Foundation made nearly 900 grants totaling $5.8 million to a wide variety of organizations in the areas of health and human services, food banks, civic, disaster relief, and education.

The Grainger Foundation, an independent private foundation, was established in 1949 by William W. Grainger, the Company’s founder.

Define Your Legacy Today

You work hard to accumulate assets throughout your life, but without a valid will or trust at your death, your assets are distributed according to state law. Wouldn’t you rather determine that yourself? Although many people think of a will as the easiest way to transfer assets after their lifetime, it doesn’t cover everything. In fact, retirement plans, IRAs, life insurance and insurance annuities are not controlled by the terms of your will, but instead use separate beneficiary paperwork to determine who receives them.

Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam’s Legacy Society was founded to create new opportunities for you to give, and to preserve our future through planned gifts.

Our Legacy Society adviser will help you and your family understand your beneficiary paperwork, and help you maximize your long-term impact in our community. By planning ahead — whether in the form of a bequest, annuity, or other planned giving arrangement — you automatically become a member of Habitat for Humanity’s Legacy Society. The reasons that people are joining our Legacy Society are as varied as the members themselves, but perhaps one common denominator is a sincere desire to give back to their community. Other advantages include:

It’s revocable. With a bequest, you are not actually making a gift until your death. Until then, you are free to alter your plans, eliminating the worry that you might make a commitment you could later regret.

It’s tax-smart. Your estate is entitled to an unlimited estate tax charitable deduction for bequests to qualified charitable organizations.

If you are considering a gift to charity after your lifetime, it is usually better to leave nontaxable assets such as stocks and real estate to your loved ones and the taxable assets such as retirement accounts and IRAs to tax-exempt charitable organizations.

Tax Benefits

 

Example: Dan would like to leave our organization his $100,000 IRA after his death. If he names us as the beneficiary for 100 percent of his IRA, we would receive the entire $100,000 to help fulfill our mission. By comparison, if Dan leaves the IRA to his sister, she will owe a sizable amount of the IRA to income taxes.

 

Your beneficiary designations can be modified at any time to meet your changing needs. However, your assets may never reach your intended recipients if you’ve failed to keep all of your beneficiary designations up to date. We suggest reviewing them every two to three years to make sure your wishes are up to date.

Habitat’s Legacy Society adviser is happy to work with you and your professional advisers to determine how your investments can better our community for generations to come. Your beneficiary designations trump your will when it comes to passing along your assets at your death, making beneficiary designations effective and easy ways to leave a legacy.

If you would like more information, or to schedule a meeting with Habitat for Humanity’s Legacy Society Adviser, please complete the form below.

 

 

 

Fall 2018 Master Homeowner Classes

Master Homeowner 2018
A unique education program creating successful homeowners.

When Terri bought her first home, she quickly realized that she had no idea how to operate a house. Terri learned quickly how much she didn’t know about being a homeowner. She had no idea that she needed to change her furnace filter until after a costly repair visit from the HVAC repairman. She didn’t know how to winterize her home, who to call if she had an electrical problem or how do diagnose a plumbing leak.

Master Homeowner“When I heard that Habitat Homebuyers receive in-depth training on how to be a successful homeowner, I thought, ‘Why hasn’t anyone offered that to people like me?'” 

Terri’s story is common. People who buy a home through conventional means receive no training in the functions and operations of their new home. The fortunate ones have a friend or a relative who can show them the ropes, but many more are left adrift without any direction or do-it-yourself know-how. By knowing how a home operates, homeowners are able to maintain the value of their home and save money by preventing costly repairs.

Recognizing that homeownership training could be a benefit Habitat could offer to the entire community – not just its own homebuyers – The Master Homeowner Program was opened in 2016 to allow any current or aspiring homeowner to participate. Most Master Homeowner Program participants have been people outside the Habitat for Humanity program.
To register for the complete nine-class Master Homeowner course, CLICK HERE. You may also register for just the classes that interest you.

To earn a Master Homeowner Certificate, homeowners must complete each of the following hands-on classes:

Homeowner’s Toolbox:
Homeowners learn what basic tools are needed for common tasks in and around the house and learn how to use the tools properly.
Monday, September 10, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Home & Neighborhood Safety:
Homeowners learn to identify potential threats to their property and learn the best practices in reporting and deterring security risks.
Monday, September 17, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

save money

Neighborhood Relations:
Homeowners learn the importance of forming positive relationships with their close neighbors and the wider community, thus being empowered to improve their neighborhood.
Monday, September 24, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Legal & Insurance Issues:
Homeowners learn from an attorney how to make the best insurance decisions, why estate planning is important and how not to become a victim of predatory lending. Homebuyers learn about the legal documents they will sign when they purchase a home.
Monday, October 1, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Home Electrical Basics: Homeowners learn the functions of a basic residential electrical system. This class teaches practical electrical safety, energy usage in the home and how to hire an electrician if one is needed.
Monday, October 8, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

save money

Home Maintenance:
Homeowners learn why it is important to maintain their home and the consequences if they do not. Students learn where to begin, what to look for, and in some circumstances how to perform maintenance that will keep the value of their investment intact.
Monday, October 15, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Home Fire Safety & Prevention:
Homeowners learn the most common causes of house fires, how to prevent fires and what to do in case of fire. This class teaches participants, hands on, how to use fire extinguishers and properly place them in the home.
Monday, October 22, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Basic Household Plumbing:
Homeowners learn how their home plumbing system works, where to check for leaks and how to prevent clogs. This class identifies common problems with household plumbing systems.
Monday, October 29, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Home Energy Efficiency:
Homeowners learn energy efficiency concepts, the advantages of controlling the conditioned air in their homes and how to identify and eliminate energy waste.
Monday, November 5, 2018
5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

save money

Cost to Participants

In order to make the Master Homeowner Program available to a wide audience, there is a fee to cover the cost of printed materials pertaining to each class. Each class costs $10.

Classes are offered in two cycles per year. If you miss a class during the current fall 2018 session — and that’s okay — then you will automatically be registered for the next cycle in spring 2019.

To register for the complete nine-class Master Homeowner course, CLICK HERE.

janie hamilton

For more information on our classes, contact Janie Hamilton.

304-720-0141 ext. 18

janie@hfhkp.org.

St. Michael Parish Sends Over Two Dozen Youth Volunteers to Charleston

Over two dozen youth volunteers from Chicago’s Saint Michael Parish are in Charleston, West Virginia this week to help Habitat for Humanity homebuyers build their future homes. The volunteer group will be in town until Friday, June 15th. They are staying at the bunk quarters at Bream Presbyterian Church. This is the 21st year that the St. Michael’s youth ministry has organized a mission trip to volunteer with Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam.

21 teens and four adults will be working at Habitat’s Charleston construction site at 847 North Hills Drive. Each day, Habitat’s construction supervisor, Bill “Tiny” Hanshaw, will present the group with several job duties such as landscaping, digging and installing drainage ditches, and moving dirt to fill in a homebuyer’s crawl space foundation. The group will be working from 8:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. each day, and then they’ll have the chance to explore Charleston. Nightly activities for the youth group include local dinners, a movie night and a trip to Cato pool. On Friday, the group plans to attend Live on the Levee before returning to Illinois.

Bill Ward and Rose Koch have been organizing and supervising St. Michael annual mission trip for 21 years. Ward says that it’s a very popular event for their church. “We always try to open this up to new kids, but this year we have about a half-dozen returning volunteers, and many of them are siblings,” says Ward.

Group membersOver the last two decades, St. Michael’s has sent hundreds of volunteers to Charleston to partner with Habitat for Humanity. The theme for this year’s annual trip is “Faith Can Move Mountains.” St. Michael’s youth ministry says its goal is to be the change that they wish to see in the world, and members of the volunteer group say that this is their chance to put their faith into action.

Mai Martino, an annual youth volunteer says, “I’ve been volunteering for four years now. It’s nice to help other people, and I just fell in love with it and have been coming back every year.”

“The work is manual labor. We’re moving dirt. We’re helping build and we’re having fun. It’s fun work,” says first-time volunteer Ryan Bonini. girls group

St. Michael’s youth ministry held a car wash in May to fund their trip. The group raised almost $900 to fund their week in Charleston. Parents and other members of the church also donated money to fund meals and transportation.

Village Chapel Parishioners Donate Over $7,800 to Habitat for Humanity

Over two dozen parishioners from Village Chapel Presbyterian Church spent their weekend volunteering at Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam’s construction site on North Hills Drive in Charleston. Village Chapel has partnered with Habitat for the non-profit’s ongoing “Building on Faith” cooperative. The church has also been raising donations for Habitat since the partnership was announced in March.

Saturday, April 21, 2018, Pastor Todd Wright from Village Chapel presented a check to Habitat’s Development Director, Bill Andreas, totaling over $7,800.Village Chapel Presbyterian Church Presents Check to Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam

“We’ve wanted to do this for a while, and I can tell you – there is more to come,” Wright said after presenting the check in front of several volunteers.

The Village Chapel volunteer group spent two days working with a Habitat homebuyer to help her build her house. The groups installed laminate flooring, painted the homes interior walls and detailed baseboards. Most of the volunteers say that this is not their first time working on Habitat’s construction site. Many also say that they will be back out this year to volunteer again.

“It’s partnership’s like this that fuel the mission of Habitat,” said Bill Andreas. “We are a Christian ministry, and this is how you put your faith into action.”

Building on FaithHabitat’s “Building on Faith” partnership brings churches together from all denominations; the mission being to spread God’s love through tangible actions. It encourages churches to partner together and with Habitat for Humanity. Parishioners from churches in the program volunteer a day of their time to help a Habitat Homebuyer build their house.

Right now, Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam is searching for more churches to partner with this build season. Habitat is in the process of working to organize a large group-build day made up of multiple church congregations, Habitat Homebuyers and other community members. A date has not been set.

If you, your church or your business would like more information about partnering with Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam, please e-mail Bill Andreas at wandreas@hfhkp.org.

City National Bank Continues Its Partnership with Habitat For Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam

City National Bank continues its partnership with Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha and Putnam this month as several employees gave up their Saturday to help a Habitat homebuyer build their home. Fourteen team members from City National signed up for a group volunteer build day, and each spent their Saturday working indoors painting a house that is nearly complete. City National employees have made hands-on contributions a regular part of their support, logging dozens of hours at the bustling construction site in Kanawha County.

 “…it just shows their high-level commitment in helping us create a better community.”

“City [National Bank] employees don’t just work in the communities they serve,” Habitat Development Director William Andreas said in a statement about the volunteers. “They are very organized, and when all the employee volunteers show up on a snowy morning it just shows their high-level commitment in helping us create a better community.”

City National became a long-term Habitat partner in 2004 with a $100,000 four-year pledge gift. That money was put towards Habitat’s campaign “Hammering in the Hills.” That campaign helped to build the North Hills Drive Housing Division in Charleston. Upon the fulfillment of that pledge, City National Bank followed up with two additional donations benefiting the Habitat for Humanity ReStore and ongoing construction jobs in Kanawha and Putnam counties.

Recently, City National Bank became a “Thank God It’s Friday Builders Club” (TGIF) sponsor. This type of partnership with Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam entitles City National employees that come out to volunteer on a one-day construction project several benefits such as on-site lunch, branded clothing and more.

Over the last two years, City National Bank has also been a major sponsor of Habitat’s largest annual fundraiser, “A Taste of … in Charleston.” Just this year, Craig Stillwell, the Executive Vice President of City National Bank, joined Habitat for Humanity’s Board of Directors.

“This year they even took their support a step further…”

“City National Bank has been a consistent donor to the work we do in the area,” said Shawn Means, Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam’s Executive Director. “This year they even took their support a step further and are coming out twice to help build. We got a major donation from the bank to put towards their second build.”

Currently, City National Bank has scheduled two full-day construction builds for 2018.

About Team Builds

There is no donation required to organize or take part in a Team Build. By participating with Habitat for Humanity for a Team Build, your team will play an important role in helping to break the cycle of poverty, strengthening our community, and building a brighter future for a local family. Your team members and company will also be featured on our website and social media platforms. Read more about Team Build Days here: http://hfhkp.org/team-build

To schedule your team build day, click here to see what dates are available. We schedule and track our volunteers through Volunteer Hub,  guiding you and your group through the process signing up and getting organized. However, if you need assistance setting up your build, contact our Development Director, William Andreas, at 304-720-0141 ext. 16 or by email at wandreas@hfhkp.org.

Hello Spring, Goodbye Clutter

It’s time to get motivated after spending the winter in a more restful state. As cold March days give way to mild April nights, more and more people are turning to home projects to break out of their winter hibernation. Spring cleaning is the most common, and easiest, thing you can do now as the weather still warms up. No one really looks forward to spring cleaning, but it helps to think about the final result: a clean and fresh house!

You may feel unsure where to start, but get your spring cleaning started by removing the clutter from your home. It’s as simple as taking stock of what you have and haven’t used lately. Outside of seasonal items, anything that you haven’t used in the last year is probably a safe bet to donate.

Divide your household items into separate piles with “keep”, “toss out”, and “donate” labels to make sure nothing is done away with improperly. It may seem hard at first, but once you get started it you’ll likely be surprised at how much you really don’t need.

Don’t just toss all of your unwanted belongings in the trash. Remember that “donate” pile. A lot of the items that have accumulated in your home are probably still in good shape and could be used by someone else. You can donate your gently used furniture to Habitat for Humanity ReStores. Most ReStores can arrange pickup for large items that won’t fit into your car. They also accept things like light fixtures, lumber, sinks, toilets, bathtubs and home goods.

ReStore Approved Donations Include

Appliances

Antiques

Architectural Items

Framed Art and Mirrors

Cabinets and Countertops

Doors and Windows

Electrical

File Cabinets

Flooring

Furniture (home and office)

Hardware

Home Decorations

ReStore Items Not Accepted

Don’t let the fear of possibly needing an item scare you into keeping things you don’t need—repurpose it so someone else can enjoy it. Donate your items and make a difference for people in your community.

Soring Cleaning Goodbye Clutter

Habitat Receives $7000 Grant from The First Presbyterian Church of Charleston

Staff and volunteers at Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam are excited to put some new funds to use building homes in Charleston. On March 26th, The First Presbyterian Church of Charleston awarded Habitat a community grant for $7000. The grant money will be directly used to purchase construction materials for Habitat’s growing North Charleston neighborhood.

Kanawha and Putnam counties are home to nearly 250,000 residents. Unfortunately, nearly one of five are suffering with the burden of substandard housing such as leaky roofs, faulty plumbing, electrical failures, inadequate heat or overcrowding. Even more are struggling with an unmanageable cost or living and raising families in fear of unsafe neighborhoods. Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam is working to change that.

Habitat helps people build homes and provides homeowner education, financial literacy training and construction training. By partnering with families, Habitat empowers communities. The non-profit mobilizes volunteers and supporters, engages corporations, foundations, churches and faith groups to get involved – whether through donations of time or money.

An Ongoing Partnership

The First Presbyterian Church of Charleston has a long-standing relationship with Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam. It has been making annual donations since 2006, and for the last few years the church has been sending out groups of 8 to 15 parishioners to spend a day on Habitat’s construction site helping Habitat partners build their homes.

This most recent grant check was presented to Habitat for Humanity’s executive director, Shawn Means. Means says that without help from the faith-based community, Habitat could not build the communities it strives to create. “We rely on partnerships to build homes. We cannot do it alone,” Means said.

After the check presentation, the church giving committee was treated to a private tour of Habitat’s administrative offices and its Charleston ReStore operation. The group of four then took a trip outside to tour Habitat’s expanding neighborhood in Charleston.

During the tour, William Andreas, development director for Habitat for Humanity of Kanawha & Putnam, explained to representatives from the church how Habitat is able to build homes and sell them to Habitat partners at a zero-interest mortgage. “Habitat mortgages are affordable because we use mostly volunteer labor and some construction materials are donated,” Andreas said. He added, “Each payment is then reinvested into our construction fund to build more homes.”

Habitat is expecting The First Presbyterian Church of Charleston to continue their partnership this build season. Right now, Habitat is in the process of working to organize a large group build day made up of church congregations, Habitat homebuyers and other community members. A date has not been set.

Click HERE to make a secure, online financial contribution.